Document Type

Poster

Publication Date

Summer 2021

Abstract

Previous literature exists that supports resistive training in the water to improve competitive swim performance. Most of these examples include research involving relationships between swim power and performance. However, no established protocols to estimate measurements of power utilizing resistive training devices exist. PURPOSE: First to estimate peak swim power using a pulley-based training device and second, to examine the relationship between peak swim power estimated via a pulley-based training device and peak power achieved during an arm ergometer test. METHODS: Swimmers took part in two separate tests of power. SWIM POWER TOWER TEST: Participants performed a series of 10-meter freestyle sprints maximal effort while tethered to the resistive pulley device. The resistance was increased on each subsequent swim bout until failure. ARM ERGOMETER TEST: Participants performed a maximal arm crank test at a resistance of 5% of their body mass for 30 seconds. A Pearson correlation coefficient was used to examine the relationship between peak powers from both tests. RESULTS: The Pearson correlation of peak swim power and peak arm ergometer power was found to be significant, R2 = 0.64; p < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Swim power was estimated using a commercial pulley-based training device. A positive relationship was found between peak swim power in the water and peak power performed during an arm ergometer test in the laboratory.

Comments

I want to thank the DePauw University Science Research Fellowship for making this research possible. I would like to personally thank Christina Bourantas for assisting in data collection in the fall of 2019. I also want to thank Professor Brian Wright for helping supervise this project.

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